Album art

Rush

Before And After

i really like this song too.  it starts out relaxing and then gets intense

Album art

Led Zeppelin

Down by the Seaside

this is my favorite song from physical graffiti.  in case the peaceful, relaxing seaside tune isn’t enough for you, it gets intense about two minutes in, and then goes back.  takes you for a wild ride.

melissakking:

In celebration of Earthbound being released on the Wii U a couple weeks back, I thought I’d repost the posters I designed for Fangamer!

http://www.fangamer.net/products/leaving-home

http://www.fangamer.net/products/fuzzy-pixels 

these are incredible

For those of you who don’t know, J. D. Salinger is an incredible American author who wrote deeply philosophical stories, often about young people.  He wrote The Catcher in the Rye, which many people read during high school.  A lot of his writing was characteristic of the post-WWII era.  He led a reclusive life, publishing few stories, and died on January 27, 2010, at the age of 91, leaving a few stories unpublished.
Staying true to his reclusive nature, Salinger stipulated in his will that a very short, unpublished collection of short stories called “Three Stories” (some Salinger fans may remember his longer collection of short stories, “Nine Stories”) should remain unpublished until fifty years after his death, which would be January 27, 2060.  Among these three stories is one called “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls,” which is particularly interesting to readers because it contains some insight towards characters in The Catcher in the Rye.
It isn’t 2060 yet, so “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls” remains unpublished.  However, the story is under the care of the Princeton University library, and they allow people to come to the library and read the unpublished material.  Readers must present two forms of identification and remain under supervision while reading the story in a secured room.
Just last year, there was some controversy over the potential leaking of this unpublished story to the public.  It’s believed that, somehow, a copy of the book was sold on eBay and its pages were scanned and released on the internet.
As of now, the original internet documentation has been taken down, but it’s likely that the material can still be found in bits and pieces on the internet if you’re willing to look hard enough.  But true advocates of Salinger may prefer to respect the man’s wishes and wait until the distant date of January 27, 2060, for the approved publication of the story, before reading.

For those of you who don’t know, J. D. Salinger is an incredible American author who wrote deeply philosophical stories, often about young people.  He wrote The Catcher in the Rye, which many people read during high school.  A lot of his writing was characteristic of the post-WWII era.  He led a reclusive life, publishing few stories, and died on January 27, 2010, at the age of 91, leaving a few stories unpublished.

Staying true to his reclusive nature, Salinger stipulated in his will that a very short, unpublished collection of short stories called “Three Stories” (some Salinger fans may remember his longer collection of short stories, “Nine Stories”) should remain unpublished until fifty years after his death, which would be January 27, 2060.  Among these three stories is one called “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls,” which is particularly interesting to readers because it contains some insight towards characters in The Catcher in the Rye.

It isn’t 2060 yet, so “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls” remains unpublished.  However, the story is under the care of the Princeton University library, and they allow people to come to the library and read the unpublished material.  Readers must present two forms of identification and remain under supervision while reading the story in a secured room.

Just last year, there was some controversy over the potential leaking of this unpublished story to the public.  It’s believed that, somehow, a copy of the book was sold on eBay and its pages were scanned and released on the internet.

As of now, the original internet documentation has been taken down, but it’s likely that the material can still be found in bits and pieces on the internet if you’re willing to look hard enough.  But true advocates of Salinger may prefer to respect the man’s wishes and wait until the distant date of January 27, 2060, for the approved publication of the story, before reading.

taiikawaii:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.
As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

taiikawaii:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.

The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.

As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

i was researching some poetry on wikipedia and i was led to a paper with this title:

we’ve moved beyond regular poetics.  we’re in the realm of quantum poetics.

Here’s a great story I read today.  All the stories in Salinger’s “Nine Stories” short story collection contain themes of spiritualism, especially in the context of Zen Buddhism.  This story is about a young boy who is surrounded by materialistic, ignorant adults, but he understands life on a higher spiritual level.  The lessons professed by the boy are interesting and enlightening, and the story’s ending is shocking and open to interpretation.  It’s an all-around good story, very reminiscent of Salinger’s more famous work, “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” (which i plan to re-read soon).

cassowary.  based on this image

cassowary.  based on this image

A Short Story Review

rosemadder15:

Because I have been increasingly overwhelmed this week and the appropriate response surely must be to write reviews that I’m only certain one person is reading (Hi, Anna.)

The short story I picked is The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Connell. Firstly, because OH MY GOD IT IS ONE OF MY FAVORITES. Second, my retired English teacher granddad gave me what is basically a high school English textbook and have found most of the poems whose names I could not remember from years ago. Also, validates my point that that learning and reading from a textbook only becomes excruciating when school is introduced. There’s a reason Jimmy Page said “I’m so glad they didn’t teach guitar in school.”

Read More

if you haven’t read this story before, read it now.  if you have read it before, read it again.  it’s pretty short and really exciting.  the plot is about a hunter who finds himself stranded on a jungle island where a wealthy aristocrat, bored with the usual big-game hunting, decides to hunt human beings for sport.  it sends a sobering message about human nature.

thanks to orangenelly for introducing me to this wonderful story.